Posts tagged 80s music
Com Truise Synth Sounds, Part Two

This year Com Truise released a new album, entitled Persuasion System. Dubbed a ‘mini-LP’, the new album marks a slight change for Seth Haley, as he started using a new DAW and built a new slate of sounds to use. In this article, I’ll look at some of the new synths sounds of Persuasion System. I’ve previously covered Seth’s sounds in the article Com Truise Synth Sounds, which concentrated mostly on sounds from his 2017 album, Iteration. In that article I wrote a little bit about which hardware synths Seth was using, however there isn’t much info about what he used on the new album. To recreate the patches for the article, I’ll use the software synths TAL U-NO-LX, u-he Repro-5 and SEM V & Mini V from the Arturia Collection.

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Blood Orange Synth Sounds

Blood Orange is the project of British musician Devonté Hynes, a fusion of 80s tinged electronica and R&B. Hynes sound is warm and full of nostalgia, and he has a talent for catchy hooks and grooves. With Blood Orange, Hynes sings, plays guitar, bass, synth, piano, saxophone and drums, as well as undertaking production duties. He contributed the score to the 2013 film Palo Alto, and also wrote Sky Ferreira’s mega-hit Everything Is Embarrassing. Hynes appears to use a variety of synths in his performances, including the Korg Minilogue seen in the music video for Saint, and a Roland Juno-106 in his NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert. For all of the patches in the article I’ll use the synth TAL U-NO-LX, a software emulation of the Roland Juno synths. As always, you can download all the patches for free at the end of the article.

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Exploring the Yamaha DX7

When you think of 80s music, some of the sounds that come to mind are sparkly electric pianos, metallic basses and cheesy orchestral elements. Many of these sounds came from one synthesizer: the Yamaha DX7. It was released in 1983, and was the first digital synthesizer to have an impact on popular music. Along with its eventual spiritual successors, the Roland D-50 and Korg M1, the DX7 marked a move away from warm analog sounds, to complex digital sounds. For a producer, the DX7 meant more sonic options in one box, and more versatility in a recording studio.

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Drive Synth Sounds

The movie Drive came out in 2011, mixing stylish violence with a subdued thoughtfulness, and has become a modern classic. The film is influenced by European cinema and 80's retro nostalgia, and it opened up the doors to similar 80's retro-inspired works like The Guest, Stranger Things and It Follows. The original soundtrack features ambient works by Cliff Martinez, and the soundtrack also makes memorable use of several synthwave songs by artists such as Kavinsky, College and Electric Youth.The movie was also rescored by Radio 1 in 2014, replacing the original score with an array of new songs by modern artists, a nice but poorly received homage.

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Timecop1983 Synth Sounds

Synthwave is an electronic music genre heavily influenced by 80’s synthpop and film soundtracks, and has reached wider popularity in the last 10 years. One of it’s most popular artists is Timecop1983, a Dutch musician otherwise known as Jody Leenaerts, who combines nostalgic 80s synths with a dream-pop production aesthetic and melancholy songwriting. Last year he released the EP _Lovers, Pt. 2_, a follow-up to 2016’s _Lovers, Pt. 1_, which I’ll focus on deconstructing in this article.

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Tears for Fears Synth Sounds

Tears for Fears' 1985 album Songs from the Big Chair is full of timeless synth-laden pop hits, combining stark poetry with slick production, the album's biggest hit was a last-minute addition titled Everybody Wants to Rule the World. Initially titled with Run instead of Rule, the song went on to blitz charts everywhere and has remained a classic of the 80s synth era. The duo, consisting of Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, were primarily songwriters, and the albums tight production was a result of utilising new at-the-time technology as well the duo's perfectionism. Everybody Wants to Rule the World was one of the simpler tracks off the album, made up of mostly MIDI programmed tracks, with the only organic elements being guitar and vocals.

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Stranger Synths | New Order - Elegia

I'm going to start the series off by looking at the song that plays during fake Will's funeral, Elegia by New Order. A dark instrumental featuring eerie sounding synths and guitars, the song was written in memory of Ian Curtis, lead singer of the band's former incarnation, Joy Division. The song was originally recorded in 1985 for the album Low-Life, and a 17 minute version was also released in 2002. Although not part of the original soundtrack composed by Michael Stein and Kyle Dixon from Survive, the lush and eerie synths of Elegia sound right at home in Stranger Things. Many people will also know the song from the Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain trailer; here's my remake using some of the synths I'll cover:

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